Busy and Prolific!













ask
submit
about me
my face
archive
music

sheepcakes:

the mayor’s private garden

sheepcakes:

the mayor’s private garden

officialcrow:

bowties are just throat fedoras

soup is the best food? i always feel so good after i eat soup. i have never felt gross after eating soup. i always feel appropriately warm and content and full. i have never felt like “oh man i shouldn’t have had those last few spoonfuls of soup”, and i’ve never felt like “aw man, that soup didn’t even make a dent, i wish i had like 10 more”

soup is the best food

secretlifeofateenblogger:

I keep forgetting what the differences are in the over the counter pain relievers, so I made a handy chart.

i like the idea of a chart to differentiate the most common over the counter pain medications —  a lot of people aren’t sure about the differences between them, and aren’t sure how to take them or what to expect. however, i think there are a lot of problems with this particular chart, which i will address:
1. ibuprofen is absolutely not mild on the stomach, and should never be taken by someone with ulcers or acid reflux (unless under direct supervision by a doctor) at the risk of gastric bleeding. ibuprofen is very hard on the digestive system and is associated with greatly increased risk for GI ulceration and bleeding.in fact, all of the NSAID drugs have negative GI effects. tylenol is the only drug on this chart that can truly be said to have mild digestive effects.
2. aspirin and acetaminophen are in fact very effective for relieving migraine pain in many people! excedrin migraine, a common over the counter migraine pain reliever, contains aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine. 
3. i disagree with ranking the medications according to how effective they are at alleviating menstrual cramps, and really the category of “best uses”. everyone’s pain is different, and everyone responds to drugs differently. while acetaminophen might be a god-send for one person with menstrual cramps, another person might swear by naproxen and only naproxen. maybe i’m misunderstanding this chart, maybe whoever made it just made it for themselves to remember which ones work best for them, and that’s fine, but the uses should not be taken as gospel. 
4. all of these drugs are broken down in the liver (though a small portion of aspirin is also metabolized at the gut wall itself), and nothing is ever broken down in the kidneys. the kidneys are involved in the excretion of all of these drugs, which is different. “break down” or metabolism is how they go from being active (and toxic!) substances to harmless (mostly) waste products, excretion is how they get out of your body. its worth noting that other forms of excretion are through sweat, saliva, and feces. the reason acetaminophen is more commonly associated with the liver is because it is acutely toxic to the liver itself — that is, it is comparatively easy to fatally damage your liver through an overdose of acetaminophen. this is not true of the other drugs listed, as overdose would manifest in other ways before liver damage occurred.
5. aspirin is an anti-platelet, not an anti-coagulant. aspirin doesn’t affect clotting factors, it just makes platelets, or the blood cell components involved in clot formation, more “slippery” so to speak, so that they don’t get stuck together. anti-coagulants affect the production of clotting factors themselves. this is sort of esoteric, but i think it’s important terminology to know about.
6. i think this was just a mix-up with formatting the table, but there should be two asterisks next to aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, and one asterisk next to acetaminophen. aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen are all non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which means that they help alleviate pain by reducing inflammation. acetaminophen, on the other hand, is not an NSAID, but is (most likely) a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, which means that it blocks the cyclooxygenase enzyme and prevents it from producing prostaglandins, which are molecules associated with pain. it’s worth noting that acetaminophen’s mechanism of action is not well understood, but since it appears to work clinically and we understand enough about it to keep it relatively safe, it’s good enough to use!

secretlifeofateenblogger:

I keep forgetting what the differences are in the over the counter pain relievers, so I made a handy chart.

i like the idea of a chart to differentiate the most common over the counter pain medications —  a lot of people aren’t sure about the differences between them, and aren’t sure how to take them or what to expect. however, i think there are a lot of problems with this particular chart, which i will address:

1. ibuprofen is absolutely not mild on the stomach, and should never be taken by someone with ulcers or acid reflux (unless under direct supervision by a doctor) at the risk of gastric bleeding. ibuprofen is very hard on the digestive system and is associated with greatly increased risk for GI ulceration and bleeding.
in fact, all of the NSAID drugs have negative GI effects. tylenol is the only drug on this chart that can truly be said to have mild digestive effects.

2. aspirin and acetaminophen are in fact very effective for relieving migraine pain in many people! excedrin migraine, a common over the counter migraine pain reliever, contains aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine. 

3. i disagree with ranking the medications according to how effective they are at alleviating menstrual cramps, and really the category of “best uses”. everyone’s pain is different, and everyone responds to drugs differently. while acetaminophen might be a god-send for one person with menstrual cramps, another person might swear by naproxen and only naproxen. maybe i’m misunderstanding this chart, maybe whoever made it just made it for themselves to remember which ones work best for them, and that’s fine, but the uses should not be taken as gospel. 

4. all of these drugs are broken down in the liver (though a small portion of aspirin is also metabolized at the gut wall itself), and nothing is ever broken down in the kidneys. the kidneys are involved in the excretion of all of these drugs, which is different. “break down” or metabolism is how they go from being active (and toxic!) substances to harmless (mostly) waste products, excretion is how they get out of your body. its worth noting that other forms of excretion are through sweat, saliva, and feces. 
the reason acetaminophen is more commonly associated with the liver is because it is acutely toxic to the liver itself — that is, it is comparatively easy to fatally damage your liver through an overdose of acetaminophen. this is not true of the other drugs listed, as overdose would manifest in other ways before liver damage occurred.

5. aspirin is an anti-platelet, not an anti-coagulant. aspirin doesn’t affect clotting factors, it just makes platelets, or the blood cell components involved in clot formation, more “slippery” so to speak, so that they don’t get stuck together. anti-coagulants affect the production of clotting factors themselves. this is sort of esoteric, but i think it’s important terminology to know about.

6. i think this was just a mix-up with formatting the table, but there should be two asterisks next to aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, and one asterisk next to acetaminophen.
aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen are all non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which means that they help alleviate pain by reducing inflammation. 
acetaminophen, on the other hand, is not an NSAID, but is (most likely) a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, which means that it blocks the cyclooxygenase enzyme and prevents it from producing prostaglandins, which are molecules associated with pain. it’s worth noting that acetaminophen’s mechanism of action is not well understood, but since it appears to work clinically and we understand enough about it to keep it relatively safe, it’s good enough to use!

elephant6collective:

Neutral Milk Hotel | Love You More Than Life

artschoolradio:

Animal Collective - Derek

(Source: notoc)

things i have trouble with

  • calculating/conceptualizing half lives of radiative elements for some reason?
  • r/s naming in stereochemistry good LORD please i need models i can’t do it with my brain i’m dyslexic its so difficult for me to think spatially in that way why do you force me to do it i gotta do it with my hands
  • doing division/multiplication of decimals and shit by hand/mentally????? its 2014 i am 22 why am i doing this shit
  • when they label graphs and i don’t understand what the labels mean and they don’t provide a key because i guess its like convention or something and i’m supposed to just understand but i DON’T because the conventions are STUPID like naming the gene that codes for a protein that’s normally long “short” and i get mixed up very easily
  • determining if something is a good solvent for a given substance or not (i know there’s rules and i roughly know them e.g. like dissolves like but there’s more to it than that and i don’t really know much beyond that…)
  • i always fuck myself up about what happens to acids/bases below and above their pKas
  • optics -_-
  • which ions are involved in which biological processes (here i am thinking calcium is involved in nerve impulse conduction but i guess its sodium and potassium? where does calcium do stuff because i know there’s calcium channels somewhere… muscles i guess? so potassium at nerves calcium at muscles? and sodium is in both? IDK need to look that up) [wait pause just checked that question again and calcium is ALSO involved in nerve shit? so is sodium there too? 3 ions? or only 2 i thought there were only 2?]
  • remembering all the goddamn mechanics/dynamics equations oh my GOD i got a frickin projectile motion question on this practice test and i just put my head down for a sec because i COULDN’T REMEMBER THE EQUATIONS and then that made me so upset that i missed a really easy one about the doppler effect right after that. i gotta not do that. gotta stay alert and focused.

ok. 2 days to pick a few of those weak spots and shore them up. a couple of them like the graph labeling thing and the calculation problems and maybe even the r/s naming i don’t think i’m gonna make much headway on because those are real fundamental problems, but the other stuff i can probably just real quick brush up on and it will be enough to carry me through thursday

mcat!

final practice test before the real thing. look who is the best critical reader in the universe.
physics is so fickle. it really just depends what kinda questions i get on thursday. shrugsies.

final practice test before the real thing. look who is the best critical reader in the universe.

physics is so fickle. it really just depends what kinda questions i get on thursday. shrugsies.

-bluish:

Kissing the Lipless // The Shins

You berate, remember your ailing heart and your criminal eyes
You say you’re still in love
If it’s true, what can be done?
It’s hard to leave all those moments behind

 

bookshop:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though
why was there temporary internet
with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!
In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).
In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.


I just love that this post happened to find the ONE HUMAN ON THE INTERNET who had the answer to this question

bookshop:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!

In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).

In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

I just love that this post happened to find the ONE HUMAN ON THE INTERNET who had the answer to this question

(Source: neilcicierega)